Optimise Local Search Rankings

10  Strategies to Boost Your Local Search Rankings

1. Update Your Business’ Information
2. Fill Out the Local Listings
3. Create Some Buzz About Your Establishment
4. Get the Right Local Keywords and Make Good Use of Them
5. Ensure Your Website is Compatible with All Devices
6. Interact with Your Customers; Ask for Reviews
7. Make Good Use of Social Media
8. Visual Content is Important
9. Strictly Abide by Your Hours
10. Invest in a Mobile App

https://is.gd/vZwDvL

Understanding Google Analytics

Understanding Google Analytics for SEO

Keywords
Geo data
Referal urls
Time spent on site
Bounce rate

E-commerce
E-commerce Conversion Rate
Ecommerce Transactions & Transaction IDs
Revenue
Average Order Value
Unique Purchases
Quantity
Average Quantity
Average Price
Product Revenue
Per Session Value

Ecommerce Data

The ecommerce data is made up of transaction data and item data.
Transaction Data
Transaction Data provide details about users’ transactions like:
Transaction ID (or order ID).
Store or affiliation name.
Total revenue generated from the transaction (can also include shipping cost and taxes)
Total tax associated with the transaction.
Total shipping cost associated with the transaction

E-Commerce Tracking in Google Analytics – Complete Guide

Terminology

Dimensions—A dimension is a descriptive attribute or characteristic of an object that can be given different values. Browser, Exit Page, Screens and Session Duration are all examples of dimensions that appear by default in Google Analytics.

Metrics—Metrics are individual elements of a dimension that can be measured as a sum or a ratio. Screenviews, Pages/Session and Average Session Duration are examples of metrics in Google Analytics.

Sessions—A session is the period of time a user is actively engaged with your website, app, etc., within a date range. All usage data (Screenviews, Events, Ecommerce, etc.) is associated with a session.

Users—Users who have had at least one session within the selected date range. Includes both new and returning users.

Pageviews—Pageviews means the total number of pages viewed. Repeated views of a single page are counted.

Pages/Session—Pages/session (Average Page Depth) is the average number of pages viewed during a session. Repeated views of a single page are counted.

Avg. Session Duration—The average length of a session.

Bounce Rate—Bounce rate is the percentage of single-page visits (i.e., visits in which the person left your site from the entrance page without interacting with the page).

New Sessions—An estimate of the percentage of first-time visits.

Goals—Goals let you measure how often users take or complete specific actions on your website.

Conversions—Conversions are the number of times goals have been completed on your website.

Campaigns—Campaigns (also known as custom campaigns) allow you to add parameters to any URL from your website to collect more information about your referral traffic.

Acquisition—Acquisition is how you acquire users.

Behavior—Behavior data helps you improve your content.

User behaviour

New vs. Returning Visitors – New visitors are those users that have not visited your site before the time period specified, while returning visitors will have made at least one visit to at least one page on your site previously. This is again determined by whether Google Analytics can detect cookies, which indicate previous visits. If Google cannot detect a cookie one will be set for future recording, unless the user has disabled cookies in their personal browser preferences.

Segments
– Segments enable you to analyse your data in more detail, by filtering the results to show only information for certain kinds of traffic. You can also use segments to compare results between groups of visitors; for example new vs. returning, or paid vs. organic search traffic. Google also allows you to set up custom segments to for even more granular analysis.
User behaviour

New vs. Returning Visitors – New visitors are those users that have not visited your site before the time period specified, while returning visitors will have made at least one visit to at least one page on your site previously. This is again determined by whether Google Analytics can detect cookies, which indicate previous visits. If Google cannot detect a cookie one will be set for future recording, unless the user has disabled cookies in their personal browser preferences.

Segments
– Segments enable you to analyse your data in more detail, by filtering the results to show only information for certain kinds of traffic. You can also use segments to compare results between groups of visitors; for example new vs. returning, or paid vs. organic search traffic. Google also allows you to set up custom segments to for even more granular analysis.

Landing Page
– The page your user begins their visit to your site on; quite simply, how they ‘land’ on your site.

Bounce Rate 
-Bounce rate is given as a percentage, and represents the number of visits when users leave your site after just one page; regardless of how they got to your site or how long they stayed on that page.

Visitors Flow
– The visitors flow report shows how users moved through your site, from landing page to exit page. – The page your user begins their visit to your site on; quite simply, how they ‘land’ on your site.

Bounce Rate 
-Bounce rate is given as a percentage, and represents the number of visits when users leave your site after just one page; regardless of how they got to your site or how long they stayed on that page.

Visitors Flow
– The visitors flow report shows how users moved through your site, from landing page to exit page.

Traffic

Traffic Sources: Direct vs. Referral – Traffic sources show you how users got to your site, and in Google Analytics are split into direct and referral traffic.

Direct traffic is made up of visitors that type a URL directly into the address bar, select an auto-complete option when typing the URL, or click on a bookmark to get to your site (however, instances when Google Analytics cannot determine a source also get automatically assigned as direct).

Referral traffic is when a user has landed on your site by clicking on a link from somewhere else; this could be another site, a social media profile, or a search engine.

Custom information

Events – Events can be set up within Google Analytics to help you measure activity that may not otherwise be recorded by the tracking code; these may include when a user plays a video, downloads a factsheet, uses an embedded tool, or other on-site interactions.

Goals – For critical site objectives, such as getting users to fill in a contact form, complete an online transaction or spend a certain amount of time engaging with your site, goals can be set up to monitor the conversion rate of these activities. There are four types of goals available in Google Analytics: URL Destination, Visit Duration, Pages (or Screens)/Visit and goals tied to existing events. You can also assign a monetary value to each goal completion, to help determine the return on investment from your website or application.

Understanding Google Analytics: A Simple Guide to Advanced Terms

https://moz.com/blog/absolute-beginners-guide-to-google-analytics

PART ONE: Understanding Your Google Analytics Report


http://www.cio.com/article/3093384/analytics/a-cios-guide-to-understanding-analytics.html

How to Use Google Analytics: Getting Started

Five Google Analytics Shortcuts to Speed Your Analysis

SEO dashboard

Google Analytics dashboards

Find these 8 amazing dashboards

1] Mobile commerce
2] The perfect ecommerce dashboard
3] Site performance dashboard
4] Blogger dashboard
5] Realtime overview dashboard
6] SEO dashboard
7] Content marketing dashboard
8] PPC dashboard
And resources to other great GA dashboards.


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SEO KPIs

Webpage Rankings

  • Find a ranking solution
  • Find the opportunities

Organic search impressions and clicks

  • Prioritize by lowest CTR – Look for pages that have a large amount of Impressions, but low CTR.

Organic search share

 

  • Create and circulate a dashboard –  This should show the monthly year-over-year organic search trend, total visits, conversions, and revenue generated from the website.
  • Provide a holistic view of performance –  Also create a dashboard showing the organic search share against PPC and other online channels.

 

Landing page metrics

  • Order your analytics report – Do this by sorting by organic visit and note the pages with a high bounce rate
  • insure that the correct keywords are being targeted
  • List of landing pages

Most popular templates of landing pages

Average number of keywords per landing page

This helps to understand how well developed your “long tail” area of search is. The more unique keywords which drive traffic

Pageviews to organic visits ratio

Divide pageviews by organic search visits, and put in descending order

Indexed Pages

Conduct advanced site searches on Google for “site:site.com” at all levels and /categories

Revenue per Search Visit

Divide revenue into organic search visits to establish dollars per search visit for each landing page

Conversion rate per keyword

Number of unique keywords that drive traffic

Top organic keywords seem to be obvious but are definitely worth taking into consideration.

 

Total organic traffic

Number of unique branding keywords that generate traffic

Keywords used in first / last visit in the purchasing process

Top profitable / popular keywords in different search engines

ROI of the SEO process

Branded to non-branded traffic

 

Read more: https://moz.com/ugc/seo-kpis-to-track-with-google-analytics

GAIQ Insight

Preparing and insight to Google Analytics Individual qualification certification

How to prepare for Google Analytics IQ
You no longer need to purchase the Google Analytics IQ exam. The Google Analytics IQ exam has moved to google.com/partners, where it is available free of charge.

To prepare for the Google Analytics Individual Qualification (IQ) exam, review all the material covered in the Analytics Academy Digital Analytics Fundamentals and Platform Principles courses. You can also use the study guide to review the content and reading list for each lesson in these courses.

When you’re ready to take the exam, visit google.com/partners. You’ll need to sign up for Google Partners and create an individual profile. This will give you access to the free exam. To access the exam, click the exam link Analytics in the left navigation, under Certifications. Once you’ve passed the exam, you’ll be able to access your personalized certificate and public profile page. Learn more about sharing your Google Analytics IQ status and accessing your profile on Google Partners. (more…)

Learning Google Analytics

Learn about Google Analytics

Platform components

Developers interact and influence processing through a rich user interface, client libraries, and APIs that are organized into 4 main components: collection, configuration, processing, and reporting

Education and training

Analytics Help Center

The Google Analytics help center has articles on features and aspects of Google Analytics.

Help Center

Analytics Academy & Analytics IQ

Analytics Academy is a free online learning platform that offers comprehensive training in Google Analytics and data analysis. You can also use Analytics Academy to prepare for the Google Analytics Individual Qualification (IQ) exam. Passing the Analytics IQ exam gives you an industry recognized qualification.

Analytics Academy Learn about the IQ exam

Videos

Videos on the official Google Analytics YouTube Channel cover beginner to advanced topics.

Demos, tools & samples

Google Analytics Demos & Tools

Google Analytics Demos & Tools provides live demos to help you learn about Google Analytics features and tools to showcase how Google Analytics can be extended with custom solutions.
Demos & Tools

Ref: https://developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/platform/

Google Analytics Insights Dashboards and custom reports

Crowd Source Google Analytics Insights.

This solutions gallery contains in-product solutions (such as dashboards, custom reports and segments) to deepen your use of Google Analytics and accelerate your learning curve. Whether you’re a newbie or guru, they will help you learn more about your data through the power of Google Analytics. Get started with our featured solutions below or refine your search by clicking the “Browse” link.

https://analytics.google.com/analytics/gallery/#landing/start/

12 Tips for great Landing Page

1. Be Specific

Your landing page should be laser targeted to a specific audience and action,  research shows that specific landing pages massively outperform generic pages and increase form submissions by 115%.

 2. Short or  convincing

For eBooks short and clear copy tends to work better
For higher priced products Landing Pages  with more content copy tend to work better , to convince visitors to buy the product.

3. Trust is vital to conversion

Your landing page and your ad need to be consistent with one another in both message, intention and media used. Visitor are more skeptic and will lose trust and thus lower the chance of converting to buy or sign up.

4. Limit outbound links

Stay conscious of how many links to other pages you may have in your landing page as this may break the users concentration or divert them else where and lower the probability of converting

5. Users are real people

Speak to your audience / visitors as though you where speaking to someone in person, and also bear in mind the audience and their technical skill in regard to the matter you are speaking about.
That is why creating customer personas is so important when creating copy for your landing page.

6. Headings

When creating your content copy for your landing page your headings and sub title heading are of absolute importance, and may be the turning point of success and failure.
As many people only tend to skim through the content but focus and read through the headings.
So before running the final ad campaign it is wise to A/B  or split test which headings and images work best.
Your headline must compel your  audience to keep reading, as it keeps the user reading.

7. Unique landing page per intent

Each landing page should be uniquely targeted to a specific intent, offer  or audience in a  marketing funnel. Don’t treat a landing page like an index page of your site, your index page server a different purpose to what a landing page does.

8. Remember SEO

This is what most new marketer tend to do, not paying attention to vital SEO practices when building  a landing page. even though most of the traffic will be through paid adversing, having a well structured page will make a difference especially pay attention to your page being, responsive to mobile devices, optimise images, page load speed and proper use of headings and short clear urls.

9. User’s Intent

Keep your focus on your audience’s initial intent of visiting your page,  remember to address his or her    frustrations, curiosities and desire.

10. User testimonials and social evidence

Adding testimonials to your landing page is a sure way of convincing the reader  that your product or service is well worth the asking price, as they to may feel that they can to relate to a certain testimonial or  have their doubts answered. Adding links or snippets of your presence on social media also server the same purpose

11. Answer the why

Don’t forget the features  and benefits statement in your copy to reassure the user why he, she should choose your product or service.

12. Pave the way

The user landed on your page to fulfill a certain purpose or goal.
Guide the user to the desired intention he or she had, pave the way with headings, messages of achieving their desired goal, trust signals and finally the CALL TO ACTION to make the purchase or sign up or what ever else the goal of the landing page may be.

The call to action button , link or form may be on various  places in a page depending on the action.
Most importantly it should be big and bold or crystal clear .

 

Semrush Dashboard

SEMrush

SEMrush is a powerful and versatile competitive intelligence suite for online marketing, from SEO and PPC to social media and video advertising research.

semrush-tutorial

Analytics Reports

Get insights into your competitors’ strategies in display advertising, organic and paid search, and link building.

Organic Research

  • See competitors’ best keywords
  • Discover new organic competitors
  • Observe position changes of domains

Keyword Research

  • Find the right keywords for SEO and PPC campaigns
  • Gather phrase matches and related keywords
  • Get long-tail keywords
  • Explore multinational and multilingual environments

Advertising Research

  • Uncover Your Competitors’ Ad Strategies and Budget
  • Analyze Your Online Rivals’ Ad Copies and Keywords
  • Discover New Competitors in AdWords and Bing Ads
  • Localize Your Ad Campaigns

Display Advertising

  • See top publishers and advertisers
  • Analyze competitors’ display ads
  • Spot new publishers
  • View displays from different devices

Backlinks

  • Conduct a deep link analysis
  • Understand referring domains’ authority
  • Check backlinks’ types
  • Spot your links’ geolocation